PCC / News / January 8, 2014

New art show explores consumerism through currency imagery

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Details from Magic 8-ball...in the Corner Pocket, oil on board; Dulia (Scroll ESC), paper and mixed media; Laundered, dryer lint; all variable dimensions, 2013.

Details from Magic 8-ball…in the Corner Pocket, oil on board; Dulia (Scroll ESC), paper and mixed media; Laundered, dryer lint; all variable dimensions, 2013.

An opening reception and artist talk will kickoff the Cascade Art Gallerys new show “Matthew W. Litteken: One Must Learn to Seduce.” Litteken will speak about his process and art from 1-1:50 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 15 in Room 222, Moriarty Arts and Humanities Building, Cascade Campus. This will be followed by the opening reception from 2-4 p.m. in the gallery, Room 102, Terrell Hall.

Litteken’s paintings and installations explore and critique consumerism. He borrows iconographic graphic design of U.S. currency and employs notions of color and design theory through traditional media of paints and non-traditional materials like dryer lint. His work has elements of eye-popping colors, provocative textures and fanciful patterns to seduce the viewer. Litteken is an art faculty member at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Litteken’s work is collected and has been exhibited around the country, and this is his first solo exhibit on the West Coast. His exhibit will be on display at the Cascade Art Gallery Jan. 15 through Feb. 20.

Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information about the gallery, visit its website, or check out Matthew Litteken’s blog for more details.

About The Author: James Hill

James G. Hill, an award-winning journalist and public relations writer, has been the Communications Specialist for the Office of Public Affairs at Portland Community College since November of 1999. A graduate of Portland State University, J... more »

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